The galapagos shark

August 24, by Jorge Mancero No Comments Hammerhead shark The Galapagos Islands is one of the few remaining places in the world where the hammerhead shark can be spotted gathering together in large school of several hundreds. The main purpose of their scalloped front edge of their hammer shaped head is to improve vision and to provide a larger area for the electroreceptors which the sharks employ for hunting their preys. The best time to see the hammerhead shark is in January, and lowest in May.

The galapagos shark

Its body is solid, large and torpedo shaped—an efficient form for swimming. Dark gray above and lighter below, the Galapagos shark has no distinctive markings except for a ridge that runs between its dorsal back fins.

If threatened by a predator or competitor, the shark arches its back, lowers its pectoral side fins and swims in figure-eight loops. If the intruder doesn't heed this display, the Galapagos shark will chase and attack the intruder.

Although Galapagos sharks are considered dangerous, they rarely attack humans. Conservation Sharks are often misunderstood; they're not maniacal eating machines, eager to devour anything or everything in their path.

Only about 30 of the approximately species of sharks are dangerous, and even these rarely attack humans. People, however, are responsible for the death of 11, sharks every hour, every day. Since sharks grow slowly, breed late in life and generally bear few young, the populations of many species of sharks are declining dramatically.

Without more regulations, many species will become extinct.

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Cool Facts This shark bears live young. The embryos receive nourishment from a placentalike attachment to the mother's uterine wall.

The galapagos shark

A shark's nose is superbly sensitive to some odors. It can detect blood in a concentration of only one part per million—the same as one teaspoon of blood in an average-size swimming pool. Galapagos sharks are curious; they often gather around and bump into boats, oars, divers or anything else that seems to take their fancy.

To rid its stomach of an indigestible object, a shark pushes its stomach out through its mouth, expels the object and then pulls its stomach back into its proper place.

The man who first identified this shark named it after the Galapagos Islands, where he observed the sharks swimming in offshore waters.The Galapagos shark is a type of Requiem shark. These sharks are found worldwide and are mostly seen in wide groups. They are active predators and are also known as the "Grey Reef Whaler".

Galapagos shark | fish | nationwidesecretarial.com

They are often seen in large groups. It was in the year that Galapagos shark was named from the specimens found near the. Galapagos Sharks. Despite its name, Galapagos sharks are found in a wide range of tropical waters. They are found in large numbers in the northern islands as well as Gordon Rocks off the north coast of Santa Cruz.

They often gather in large groups and will be the most abundant species on a reef.

Galapagos Shark

Since records of shark accidents were first recorded in there have been a total of 8 incidents of sharks in the Galapagos Islands and only 3 involving tourists. Two were tuna fishermen chumming the water in the s, and one of them actually fell overboard into a school of fish!

The galapagos shark

Three were surfers. The Galapagos shark is a species of requiem shark – a family of migratory, live-bearing sharks found in warm waters. Despite its name, the Galapagos shark is found all over the world, but it was first discovered in what is now the Galapagos Marine Reserve.

Galapagos sharks primarily inhabit clear waters, coral reefs and rocky bottoms, and often swim a few meters above the substrate. The Galapagos Shark is a common but habitat-limited species, and is normally found at depths of 2 m but ranges to the open ocean adjacent to islands, from the surface to at least 80 m.

Galapagos sharks primarily inhabit clear waters, coral reefs and rocky bottoms, and often swim a few meters above the substrate. The Galapagos Shark is a common but habitat-limited species, and is normally found at depths of 2 m but ranges to the open ocean .

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