The history of jazz and classical music in america

History of Jazz and Classical Music You are here: History History of Jazz and Classical… Some of the most accomplished musicians of our time have devoted themselves to a lifelong study of Jazz or Classical music, and a few exceptional musicians have actually mastered both.

The history of jazz and classical music in america

See Article History Jazz, musical formoften improvisational, developed by African Americans and influenced by both European harmonic structure and African rhythms. It was developed partially from ragtime and blues and is often characterized by syncopated rhythms, polyphonic ensemble playing, varying degrees of improvisation, often deliberate deviations of pitch, and the use of original timbres.

Any attempt to arrive at a precise, all-encompassing definition of jazz is probably futile. Jazz has been, from its very beginnings at the turn of the 20th century, a constantly evolving, expanding, changing music, passing through several distinctive phases of development; a definition that might apply to one phase—for instance, to New Orleans style or swing —becomes inappropriate when applied to another segment of its history, say, to free jazz.

Early attempts to define jazz as a music whose chief characteristic was improvisationfor example, turned out to be too restrictive and largely untrue, since compositionarrangementand ensemble have also been essential components of jazz for most of its history.

Similarly, syncopation and swing, often considered essential and unique to jazz, are in fact lacking in much authentic jazz, whether of the s or of later decades. Again, the long-held notion that swing could not occur without syncopation was roundly disproved when trumpeters Louis Armstrong and Bunny Berigan among others frequently generated enormous swing while playing repeated, unsyncopated quarter notes.

Jazz, in fact, is not—and never has been—an entirely composed, predetermined music, nor is it an entirely extemporized one. For almost all of its history it has employed both creative approaches in varying degrees and endless permutations.

And yet, despite these diverse terminological confusions, jazz seems to be instantly recognized and distinguished as something separate from all other forms of musical expression.

Most early classical composers such as Aaron CoplandJohn Alden Carpenter —and even Igor Stravinskywho became smitten with jazz were drawn to its instrumental sounds and timbres, the unusual effects and inflections of jazz playing brass mutes, glissandos, scoops, bends, and stringless ensemblesand its syncopations, completely ignoring, or at least underappreciating, the extemporized aspects of jazz.

Indeed, the sounds that jazz musicians make on their instruments—the way they attack, inflect, release, embellish, and colour notes—characterize jazz playing to such an extent that if a classical piece were played by jazz musicians in their idiomatic phrasings, it would in all likelihood be called jazz.

Nonetheless, one important aspect of jazz clearly does distinguish it from other traditional musical areas, especially from classical music: In jazz West Africa in the American South: These elements are not precisely identifiable because they were not documented—at least not until the mid- to late 19th century, and then only sparsely.

Furthermore, black slaves came from diverse West African tribal cultures with distinct musical traditions. Thus, a great variety of black musical sensibilities were assembled on American soil.

These in turn rather quickly encountered European musical elements—for example, simple dance and entertainment musics and shape-note hymn tunessuch as were prevalent in early 19th-century North America.

The music that eventually became jazz evolved out of a wide-ranging, gradually assimilated mixture of black and white folk musics and popular styles, with roots in both West Africa and Europe. It is only a slight oversimplification to assert that the rhythmic and structural elements of jazz, as well as some aspects of its customary instrumentation e.

Nevertheless, jazz syncopation struck nonblack listeners as fascinating and novel, because that particular type of syncopation was not present in European classical music. The syncopations in ragtime and jazz were, in fact, the result of reducing and simplifying over a period of at least a century the complex, multilayered, polyrhythmic, and polymetric designs indigenous to all kinds of West African ritual dance and ensemble music.

In other words, the former accentuations of multiple vertically competing metres were drastically simplified to syncopated accents. The provenance of melody tune, theme, motive, riff in jazz is more obscure.

In all likelihood, jazz melody evolved out of a simplified residue and mixture of African and European vocal materials intuitively developed by slaves in the United States in the s and s—for example, unaccompanied field hollers and work songs associated with the changed social conditions of blacks.

The widely prevalent emphasis on pentatonic formations came primarily from West Africa, whereas the diatonic and later more chromatic melodic lines of jazz grew from late 19th- and early 20th-century European antecedents.Feb 28,  · Positioning jazz as ''America's classical music'' could keep people away from jazz's earthiness and exaltation.

Putting the ''classical'' stamp on jazz is a way of insisting on the music's. History of Jazz and Classical Music, Free Study Guides and book notes including comprehensive chapter analysis, complete summary analysis, author biography information, character profiles, theme analysis, metaphor analysis, and top ten quotes on classic literature.

Jazz is a music genre that originated in African American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Since the s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical nationwidesecretarial.coml instruments: Horns, piano, keyboards, bass, drums, guitar, vocals.

The history of jazz and classical music in america

The Scholastic History of Jazz resource site is full of audio clips, history, and research starters on the subject of jazz. Join Grammy-Award winning trumpeter and Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center Wynton Marsalis on a tour of jazz — see the people, read about the events, and listen to the music.

History of Jazz and Classical Music This Research Paper History of Jazz and Classical Music and other 64,+ term papers, college essay examples and free essays are available now on nationwidesecretarial.com Autor: review • November 10, • Research Paper • 1, Words (8 Pages) • Views4/4(1).

Jazz: Jazz, musical form, often improvisational, developed by African Americans and influenced by both European harmonic structure and African rhythms. It is often characterized by syncopated rhythms, polyphonic ensemble playing, and the use of original timbres.

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America’s Music History: The Jazz Age | Kent State Online Master of Music in Music Education